Friday, May 25, 2007

Do I listen to Pod casts?

Dario asked if I listened to a Podcast he takes part in. It is the ‘Jefferson Davis & Friends Podcast. The other participants are Brianf and Grandad. Dario is a first year University student at UCD in Dublin. Like all eighteen year-olds he is in a hurry to experience NOW all that the life of an adult holds. Dario hand on heart I can tell you that no adult has been able to do so. If it were possible to learn all there is to learn in your short life so far, think how boring the next 80 years might prove.

Yes, I have listened to your Podcast and did understand what you were saying. I have the patience to let my ears acclimatise to the sound of the various accents in a Podcast. Did you ever wonder why I spoke so slowly when making a Podcast? It is to allow folk who are unused to the sound of my voice to hear each word. If you speak at normal conversation speed it may not come over, across the airwaves.

Conn Ó Muíneacháin of Edgecast media:> was the official Pod-caster at the IrishBusinessWomen.com conference last weekend in Westport, Ireland. Terry Prone of Carr Communications was a speaker and she gives food for thought to all of us who seek to communicate. Terry is my vintage and she believes in what she does, and this means she gives a convincing message without us realising. You can link to it at (24MB, 41:14, MP3),

I have to admit that I was dependant on my voice to communicate all my working life. Folk heard me speak and sometimes never met me.

On one occasion a gentleman came into the office and I happened to be the first person he spoke to. I asked if I could help him. He said that he had an appointment with one of our director’s. I addressed him by name and said that he was expected, and to take a seat while I informed the director of his arrival. He called me back and said “I have never met you before; in fact I have never visited this office. How did you know my name?” I smiled and again addressed him by name saying “I speak to you on a regular basis by phone”.

At times I have difficulty putting a name to a person’s face. If I close my eyes and listen to them the name usually comes to me.

By the way Grandad’s voice was not how I imagined it at all. He sounds far to young to be a Grandad!

I suppose one of these days I will have to think of a subject to Podcast about.

6 comments:

Dario Sanchez said...

Eh, well you have a comprehensible accent. I can't place it, but if I had to guess I would say East Coast of some description.

I, contrary to what i hear in my head, have a thick as honey Cavan accent, so that's why I asked.

grannymar said...

Yes I would say you have a Cavan accent Dario but you notice it more than others do.

For years I only heard a flat Dublin accent in my voice and cringed, others didn't. They said I had a soft brogue.

The last thirty years here in the north has perhaps changed it. And being married for years to a man from Co Durham, England may also have had an effect

Dario Sanchez said...

Would I be right in saying either Suthside or County Dublin?

grannymar said...

Sorry Dario you are wrong on both counts. My father came from Co Clare so perhaps that had a bearing.

My mum had a long pointy finger which she used if she heard us speak with a 'flat Dublin twang'. I suppose that made some difference.

Conn said...

Hi Grannymar - glad you enjoyed Terry Prone's podcast!

Actually, I'm struck by the similarity in the way you and Terry speak. Slowly, clearly - I'm hanging on every word!

By the way, I'll be publishing some of the chat we had at the blog awards soon!

Best wishes,
Conn

grannymar said...

Thank you Conn, as I said earlier Terry and I are the one vintage and the world was a slower place when we were young.

I thought I had missed the Awards interviews.

Perhaps once Elly's wedding is out of the way I might get back to podcasts again.